PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Encyclopedia of Anthropology

iconEncyclopedia

Encyclopedia of Anthropology

H. James Birx

Pub. date: 2006 | Online Pub. Date: September 15, 2007 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412952453 | Print ISBN: 9780761930297 | Online ISBN: 9781412952453 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

About this encyclopedia
PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Text size

Anthropology, Visual

Jerome Crowder

Since the advent of modern photographic technology (still and moving), the use of visual methods for anthropological documentation and inquiry has been an integral part of the discipline, although it was not formally known as visual anthropology until after World War II. Visual anthropology has been used to document, preserve, compare, and illustrate culture manifested through behaviors and artifacts, such as dance, proxemics, and architecture. As well, archaeologists and primatologists have respectively employed visual methods in their research to capture images of elevations and excavations, and individuals and their behaviors. While critics of visual anthropology cite that it is unscientific in method, only serves to illustrate written ethnography, and does not propose theoretical positions, visual anthropology today is a means for seeing and presenting anthropological thinking in its own right. Over time, visual methods have evolved to foster new research questions and analysis, redefining how visual researchers approach the study ...

Users without subscription are not able to see the full content on this title. Please, subscribe or login to access all content on this website.