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The SAGE Handbook of Geomorphology

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The SAGE Handbook of Geomorphology

Kenneth J. Gregory & Andrew S. Goudie

Pub. date: 2011 | Online Pub. Date: August 22, 2011 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781446201053 | Print ISBN: 9781412929059 | Online ISBN: 9781446201053 | Publisher:SAGE Publications Ltd

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Chapter 15: Human Activity and Geomorphology

Dénes Lóczy & László Sütő

Human activity and geomorphology Landscapes are the products of interactions between abiotic and biotic factors. Ever since its appearance, even before the beginning of recorded history, human society has been involved in the system of geomorphic processes. The intensity of involvement has been proportional to the size of the human population, to its demands upon the environment and to the level of technological progress achieved to satisfy growing demands. The significance of human activities in the evolution of the Earth's surface was recognized as early as the mid-19th century. In the United States George Perkins Marsh published a book entitled Man and Nature in 1864 (reprinted as The Earth as Modified by Human Action , Marsh, 1965). The Italian geologist Antonio Stoppani (1873) found human action comparable to other landscape-shaping forces and was the first to speak of an ‘Anthropozoic era’ (Crutzen, 2006). Elisée Reclus (1869) and Karl Ritter's students ...

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