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The SAGE Handbook of Media Studies

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The SAGE Handbook of Media Studies

John D. H. Downing & Denis McQuail & Philip Schlesinger & Ellen Wartella

Pub. date: 2004 | Online Pub. Date: June 22, 2009 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412976077 | Print ISBN: 9780761921691 | Online ISBN: 9781412976077 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Chapter 4: Globalization, Supranational Institutions, and Media

John Sinclair

Globalization, supranational institutions, and media As the 20th century entered its closing decade, the concept of globalization became ever more seen and heard as “a key idea by which we understand the transition of human society into the third millennium” (Waters, 1995, p. 1) but with ever-decreased precision of meaning. At least in the humanities disciplines and social sciences relevant to media studies, one reason for this was that globalization was more than a new concept—it marked nothing less than a fundamental shift in the scope of their paradigm, as academic disciplines adjusted their focus to look beyond their former unit of analysis, the nation-state. Previously, to talk about “a society” or “a media system” meant a more-or-less self-contained national society and its media system—American, British, Canadian, and so on. The concept of globalization was adopted as it became necessary to see each nation-state and its various systems—cultural as well ...

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