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Encyclopedia of Counseling

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Encyclopedia of Counseling

Frederick T. L. Leong

Pub. date: 2008 | Online Pub. Date: June 25, 2008 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412963978 | Print ISBN: 9781412909280 | Online ISBN: 9781412963978 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Neuropsychological Functioning

Ann Westcot Barich

Neuropsychology is the study of brain-behavior relationships through objective, scientific methods. The main goal in neuropsychology is to understand how the brain produces and controls behavior and mental processes, including emotions, cognition, and consciousness. This goal is met by studying both healthy and damaged brain systems using objective measures to link biological and behavioral domains. The goal of clinical neuropsychology is to study how cognitive skills such as memory, language, and attention change an individual's life as a result of brain injury, disease, or developmental process. The ultimate objective is the clinical application of that knowledge to human problems. Neuropsychological tests and methods are used to compare an individual's behavior to that of individuals with known brain dysfunction and to a normal control population. Psychologists draw inferences from the test data regarding what type of brain dysfunction may be present. From this point, realistic expectations for adjustment, remediation, and Neuropsychology ...

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