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Courts, Law, and Justice

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Courts, Law, and Justice

William J. Chambliss

Pub. date: 2011 | Online Pub. Date: June 24, 2011 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412994125 | Print ISBN: 9781412978576 | Online ISBN: 9781412994125 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Chapter 16: Restorative Justice

William R. Wood

Restorative justice Restorative justice is both a philosophy and loosely aligned set of interventions that focus less on crime as the breaking of laws than as the harming or breaking of human relationships. Emerging in the 1970s and 1980s as an alternative to more traditional youth and adult justice practices, restorative justice interventions such as victim-offender mediation, sentencing circles, and family group conferencing are largely organized around the principles of victim participation and redress, offender accountability and reintegration, and community participation in local justice practices. Such practices are thought to meet the needs of these three groups more directly and comprehensively than more traditional rehabilitative or punitive approaches, and these three groups are seen as the primary social actors through which both crime redress and crime reduction can be best achieved. Primarily, restorative justice seeks to include victims in their own cases, ideally in settings that afford them the possibility ...

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