PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment

iconEncyclopedia

Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment

David Levinson

Pub. date: 2002 | Online Pub. Date: September 15, 2007 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412950664 | Print ISBN: 9780761922582 | Online ISBN: 9781412950664 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

About this encyclopedia
PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Text size

Due Process

William E. Kelly

In the United States, the justice system is expected to be fair. But what does “fairness” mean? Because it can mean different things to different people, and that meaning can change over time, it is not easy to come up with a definition of fairness that fits all occasions and will be interpreted the same way by all who are asked to comment on it. The same may be said for the very important words due process , which are often heard in reference to the American system of justice. These words affect all Americans in one way or another, and they have had a profound effect on society, particularly in the area of criminal justice. The words due process are found in two important amendments to the U.S. Constitution: the Fifth Amendment and the Fourteenth Amendment. The Fifth Amendment, which is a part of the Bill of Rights, stipulates ...

Users without subscription are not able to see the full content on this title. Please, subscribe or login to access all content on this website.