PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
21st Century Criminology: A Reference Handbook

iconHandbook

21st Century Criminology: A Reference Handbook

J. Mitchell Miller

Pub. date: 2009 | Online Pub. Date: September 17, 2009 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412971997 | Print ISBN: 9781412960199 | Online ISBN: 9781412971997 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

About this handbook
PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Text size

Chapter 33: Self-Control Theory

Travis C. Pratt & Jonathon A. Cooper

Self-control theory Self-control theory—often referred to as the general theory of crime —has emerged as one of the major theoretical paradigms in the field of criminology. This is no small feat, given the diversity of criminological perspectives that exist in general and the ever-growing roster of recently sprouted control theories in particular. To be sure, scholars have developed models of formal social control (e.g., rational choice/deterrence theories), informal social control (e.g., social disorganization, collective efficacy), indirect control (e.g., social bond theories), power control, and so on, yet self-control theory has arguably become the most influential member of the control theory family since its publication by M. R. Gottfredson and Hirschi in 1990. Accordingly, the purpose of this chapter is fourfold: (1) to provide an overview of the core theoretical propositions specified by self-control theory (i.e., what causes crime, according to this perspective?); (2) to critically assess its empirical status (i.e., ...

Users without subscription are not able to see the full content on this title. Please, subscribe or login to access all content on this website.