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Cultural Theory: Classical and Contemporary Positions

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Cultural Theory: Classical and Contemporary Positions

Tim Edwards

Pub. date: 2007 | Online Pub. Date: May 31, 2012 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781446216682 | Print ISBN: 9780761948636 | Online ISBN: 9781446216682 | Publisher:SAGE Publications Ltd

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Chapter Four: Stuart Hall and the Birmingham School

Chris Rojek

Stuart hall and the birmingham school British Cultural Studies commenced in its contemporary form in the late 1950s. Its roots were in secondary Schools, Adult Education and Extra Mural departments of Universities. The first wave of significant figures to write about working class culture seriously in the postwar period were Raymond Williams, Edward Thompson and Richard Hoggart. 1 They wrote against the grain of the core curriculum enshrined in the established Universities with its pronounced emphasis on the classical canon and ‘Great Traditions’ of thought. To some extent, their project consisted in validating working class culture as a subject for study in the Academy. Williams in Culture & Society (1958) and The Long Revolution (1961) and Thompson (1963) in The Making of the English Working Class operated in a Left wing milieu that deplored the intellectual narrowness of British academic life and sought to demonstrate the richness of working culturalism, ...

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