PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Encyclopedia of Curriculum Studies

iconEncyclopedia

Encyclopedia of Curriculum Studies

Craig Kridel

Pub. date: 2010 | Online Pub. Date: March 23, 2010 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412958806 | Print ISBN: 9781412958837 | Online ISBN: 9781412958806 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

About this encyclopedia
PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Text size

Subject-Centered Curriculum

Larry D. Burton

Throughout the 20th century, most curriculum specialists in the UnitedStates relied on three or four data sources for making curriculumdecisions: the child, the society, learning processes, and subjectmatter. Although alternative curriculum development approaches or modelshave been advanced that relied on the first three sources, the subjectareas have dominated school curriculum since the beginning of formaleducation in the United States. Subject-centered curriculum remains themost common type of curriculum organization in most states and in mostlocal school districts today. In subject-centered curricula, the subject matter itself serves as theorganizing structure for what is studied and how it is studied. In itspurest form, the curriculum for each subject-area is designed bysubject-matter experts and is intended to be studied usingsubject-specific methods and tools of inquiry. Emphasis is on developingan understanding of the ...

Users without subscription are not able to see the full content on this title. Please, subscribe or login to access all content on this website.