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Developing Counsellor Supervision

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Developing Counsellor Supervision

Colin Feltham & Windy Dryden

Pub. date: 1994 | Online Pub. Date: May 31, 2012 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781446222324 | Print ISBN: 9780803989399 | Online ISBN: 9781446222324 | Publisher:SAGE Publications Ltd

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Chapter 12: Consider the Relative Advantages and Disadvantages of Individual, Group and Peer Supervision

Consider the relative advantages and disadvantages of individual, group and peer supervision Many counsellor training courses recommend that trainees receive a mixture of individual and group supervision. Such a mixture exposes trainees to the intensive attention of individual supervision and the many challenges of group supervision. It also begins to teach them about the relative merits of these two forms of supervision. But compromises are often involved in these matters and supervisees may find themselves in one or other of these settings not from choice but because alternatives are not practicable. Supervisees may go through an entire training with very little individual supervision because it is too expensive to provide, for example. We propose here to examine the advantages and disadvantages of individual, group and peer supervision, all of which have merits and problems and all of which are endorsed as valuable by the BAC (see Appendix 2). In one-to-one ...

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