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Encyclopedia of Management Theory

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Encyclopedia of Management Theory

Eric H. Kessler

Pub. date: 2013 | Online Pub. Date: May 08, 2013 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781452276090 | Print ISBN: 9781412997829 | Online ISBN: 9781452276090 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Intuitive Decision Making

Michael G. Pratt

In the vernacular, intuition is equated with “trusting your gut” and involves knowing something without knowing how you know it. A subject of scholarly discourse for hundreds of years, intuition has become a topic in management primarily in the last few decades. While conceptualizations in philosophy, psychology, and management vary to some degree, Erik Dane and Michael Pratt suggest four characteristics that are fundamental to intuiting. With regard to the process of intuitive decision making, or intuiting, they note that information processing during intuiting is (a) nonconscious, (b) happens quickly, (c) holistic rather than analytic, and (d) affectively charged, from start to finish. With regard to the outcomes of intuiting, we argue that intuiting results in the formation of a judgment. Put plainly, intuition is a relatively fast way to make judgments that involves seeing patterns across data or stimuli. The process of intuition occurs outside conscious awareness; thus, one ...

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