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Encyclopedia of
the Social and Cultural Foundations of Education

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Encyclopedia of the Social and Cultural Foundations of Education

Eugene F. Provenzo Jr. & Asterie Baker Provenzo

Pub. date: 2009 | Online Pub. Date: December 16, 2008 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412963992 | Print ISBN: 9781412906784 | Online ISBN: 9781412963992 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Discursive Practices

Felecia Briscoe

Briefly defined, discursive practices in education are the uses of language in an educational context (e.g., the typical pattern of teacher question, student answer, teacher feedback) or the use of language in context relating to education (e.g., state legislators' talk when making new educational laws). Language includes spoken, signed, and written forms of communication. Context includes the aspects of the situation in which such communication takes place that affect the meaning of the communication either in its production or its reception. Part of the context of language use is the relevant language that comes before and after the particular discursive practice in question. Thus, discursive practices generally encompass language chunks larger than one sentence. Discursive practices in education are increasingly of interest to a number of academic disciplines. Some of the discursive practices that have been examined include Rosemary Henze's work on the metaphors used by school leaders use when ...

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