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Encyclopedia of Geography

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Encyclopedia of Geography

Barney Warf

Pub. date: 2010 | Online Pub. Date: September 01, 2010 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412939591 | Print ISBN: 9781412956970 | Online ISBN: 9781412939591 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Extreme Geography

David J. Nemeth

Extreme human geography is a critique that celebrates odd juxtapositions; it is not to be confused with extreme physical geography, which has its own distinct cabinet of remarkable curiosities. Extreme geography as a recurring subversive idea in the history of geographic thought manifests as fantasy mapping, counterfactual geographies, science fiction spaces/places, and other imaginative social critiques. As an identifiable critical “tradition” in modern Western geographic thought, its convoluted heritage is cross-disciplinary and can be traced in fits and spurts from Homer, through Diogenes of Sinope, Saint Francis of Assisi, and Athanasias Kircher, to Guy Debord, Ursula K. Le Guin, and recently a conspiratorial ...

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