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Encyclopedia of Geography

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Encyclopedia of Geography

Barney Warf

Pub. date: 2010 | Online Pub. Date: September 01, 2010 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412939591 | Print ISBN: 9781412956970 | Online ISBN: 9781412939591 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Forest Restoration

Joy A. Fritschle

The widespread destruction of habitats and the associated loss of species have resulted in the development of ecological restoration projects worldwide. The restoration of degraded ecosystems can serve to improve not only the conservation of species but also ecosystem productivity and the welfare of human communities affected by those ecosystems. The Society for Ecological Restoration International defines the practice of ecological restoration as “the process of assisting the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged, or destroyed.” Forest restoration represents a particular type of restoration practice. An extensive body of scientific evidence indicates that preservation of biological reserves is not enough to stem the current biodiversity crisis. While preservation of forests in parks, reserves, and wilderness areas is critical, these landscapes are too fragmented and too small in area. Restoration of degraded and damaged forests is necessary to enable humans to sustainably live and work in ecosystems. Restoration ...

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