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The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction

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The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction

F. Michael Connelly & Ming Fang He & JoAnn Phillion

Pub. date: 2008 | Online Pub. Date: June 22, 2009 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412976572 | Print ISBN: 9781412909907 | Online ISBN: 9781412976572 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Chapter 6: Curriculum Implementation and Sustainability

Michael Fullan

Curriculum implementation and sustainability Thirty years ago Alan Pomfret and I published the first review of research on curriculum implementation (Fullan & Pomfret, 1977). The term implementation had only been in use for a few years. It first came on the curriculum scene around 1970 when several scholars—John Goodlad, Neal Gross, and Seymour Sarason being the most notable—began to highlight that the heady days of curriculum innovations of the 1960s had one fatal flaw, namely the ideas were not finding their way into the classroom. In fact, Goodlad and Klein's (1970) Behind the Classroom Door investigated the main innovative themes of the day and found not only that there was an absence of evidence of the innovations being used in schools claiming to use particular innovations, but also that some schools not claiming to be using specific innovations were indeed showing use without being aware of it. Clearly the Pomfret ...

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