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The SAGE Handbook of Industrial Relations

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The SAGE Handbook of Industrial Relations

Paul Blyton & Nicolas Bacon & Jack Fiorito & Edmund Heery

Pub. date: 2008 | Online Pub. Date: October 01, 2010 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781849200431 | Print ISBN: 9781412911542 | Online ISBN: 9781849200431 | Publisher:SAGE Publications Ltd

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Chapter 5: Values, Ideologies, and Frames of Reference in Industrial Relations

John W. Budd & Devasheesh Bhave

Values, ideologies, and frames of reference in industrial relations Industrial relations-or what some might now call employment relations, and what others might call human resources and industrial relations-is a multidisciplinary field studying all aspects of work and the employment relationship (Ackers and Wilkinson, 2003; Budd, 2004; Kaufman, 2004). A multidisciplinary approach means that competing values and assumptions underlie the analyses, policies, and practices of employment relations scholars, practitioners, and policymakers. Unfortunately, these underlying beliefs are often implicit rather than explicit, or, with the long-standing focus on how industrial relations (IR) processes work, sometimes ignored altogether. But understanding the industrial relationship, corporate human resource management practices, labor union strategies, and work-related public policies and laws requires understanding how values and assumptions form the ideologies and frames of reference used by scholars, practitioners, and policymakers. According to Kochan and Katz, ‘The primary thread running through industrial relations research and policy prescriptions is ...

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