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The SAGE Handbook of Industrial Relations

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The SAGE Handbook of Industrial Relations

Paul Blyton & Nicolas Bacon & Jack Fiorito & Edmund Heery

Pub. date: 2008 | Online Pub. Date: October 01, 2010 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781849200431 | Print ISBN: 9781412911542 | Online ISBN: 9781849200431 | Publisher:SAGE Publications Ltd

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Chapter 8: New Forms of Work and the High Performance Paradigm

Stephen Procter

New forms of work and the high performance paradigm We can date the emergence of the high performance model to a series of studies published in the US in the mid-1990s (Appelbaum and Batt, 1994; Delery and Doty, 1996; Huselid, 1995; Ichniowski et al., 1997; MacDuffie, 1995; Osterman, 1994; Pfeffer, 1994). Their basic concern was to see whether new ways of organizing work and managing people were having an effect on the performance of organizations. For some, this represents a new research paradigm, in which more traditional institutional concerns are played down or neglected completely (Godard and Delaney, 2000). Others see it as a more natural reflection of the shift in the balance of power in the employment relationship in favor of management and employers. Although reaching a precise definition would be difficult and probably counterproductive, the new forms of work being investigated are likely to involve the following: an ...

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