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The SAGE Handbook of Philosophy of Education

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The SAGE Handbook of Philosophy of Education

Richard Bailey & Robin Barrow & David Carr & Christine McCarthy

Pub. date: 2010 | Online Pub. Date: March 31, 2011 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781446200872 | Print ISBN: 9781847874672 | Online ISBN: 9781446200872 | Publisher:SAGE Publications Ltd

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Chapter 2: Schools of Thought in Philosophy of Education

Robin Barrow

Schools of thought in philosophy of education There are a number of ways in which the field of philosophy of education might be organized, whether for purposes of study or teaching. For example, one might study prominent philosophers who have something to say relevant to education, in their historical order (e.g., Plato, Rousseau); one might study prominent educational thinkers, whether philosophers or not, in a philosophical manner (e.g., Pestalozzi, Freire); or one might focus on particular branches of philosophy and their implications for education (e.g., moral philosophy and moral education, philosophy of science and science teaching). Some argue that, ideally, philosophy of education should involve a systematic inquiry into ultimate questions about the nature of being or existence (metaphysics), allied to a theory of knowledge or what can be known (epistemology) and concern for questions of value of various kinds, be it moral, aesthetic, economic, etc. (axiology), which in practice ...

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