PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Handbook of Global Supply Chain Management

iconHandbook

Handbook of Global Supply Chain Management

John T. Mentzer & Matthew B. Myers & Theodore P. Stank

Pub. date: 2007 | Online Pub. Date: June 22, 2009 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412976169 | Print ISBN: 9781412918053 | Online ISBN: 9781412976169 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

About this handbook
PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Text size

Chapter 25: Interfunctional Coordination

Susan L. Golicic & Kate Vitasek

Interfunctional coordination In business today the pace of change is relentless, and business processes of global reach are ubiquitous. Increasingly, a company's competitive edge comes not from its unique products, its geographic spread, or its cost structure. Much of the traditional strategic advantages that have served companies so well can generally be reverse-engineered and often at a lesser cost. The impact of this rapid evolution and broad geographic span is simply a smaller window through which competitiveness can be defined. The pace of change ensures there will quickly be the next best widget to replace the one launched just yesterday. The global reach of business processes ensures that the East Indian widget and the North American widget will have the opportunity to reach identical target audiences with products of limited differentiation. Often, a competitive edge comes from the unique culture that the company creates and through which its changing product ...

Users without subscription are not able to see the full content on this title. Please, subscribe or login to access all content on this website.