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Encyclopedia of Journalism

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Encyclopedia of Journalism

Christopher H. Sterling

Pub. date: 2009 | Online Pub. Date: December 16, 2009 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412972048 | Print ISBN: 9780761929574 | Online ISBN: 9781412972048 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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News Hole

William S. Solomon

The definition of news hole has evolved over time. Initially the term referred to that part of a newspaper or magazine that is available for news stories, after subtracting the space taken up by advertising. Years later, with the advent of broadcast media, the meaning of the term expanded to include the amount of airtime available for news content within a news broadcast or cable news channel. Today's definition would include the effects of the Internet: offering theoretically unlimited space plus minimal production and distribution costs. In general usage, then, news hole refers to the editorial core of a print or electronic journalism publication or program. The origins of the term news hole reflect the industrial era within which it was coined. PostCivil War economic growth and large-scale immigration facilitated what historian Martin Sklar (1988) calls the “corporate reconstruction” of the country: This fashioned the newspaper into a more The ...

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