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Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement

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Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement

Larry E. Sullivan & Marie Simonetti Rosen & Dorthy Moses Schulz & M. R. Haberfeld

Pub. date: 2004 | Online Pub. Date: September 15, 2007 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412952415 | Print ISBN: 9780761926498 | Online ISBN: 9781412952415 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Community Policing: A Caribbean Case Study

Keith Carrington

Many police departments have become victims of the “means over ends” syndrome because the administration focused primarily on organization and operations while paying little attention to their overall performance (Goldstein, 2002). Such internal emphasis prevents the police from dealing effectively with crime and disorder. In the Caribbean, the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service's (TTPS) shift to community policing in 1991 in many ways represents the many countries in the Caribbean that have adopted a community policing approach. The experience of Trinidad and Tobago shows how the administration reacted to concerns about the organization's handling of crime and other social problems. Community policing was introduced to complement the service's traditional approach to policing. The strategy was expected to change the organization's reactive approach to crime fighting, which excluded community input, to a proactive approach with community involvement. According to the TTPS, community policing is defined as: a philosophy and an organizational ...

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