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Measurement Theory in Action: Case Studies and Exercises

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Measurement Theory in Action: Case Studies and Exercises

Kenneth S. Shultz & David J. Whitney

Pub. date: 2005 | Online Pub. Date: May 31, 2012 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781452224749 | Print ISBN: 9780761927303 | Online ISBN: 9781452224749 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Module 5: Classical True Score Theory and Reliability

Classical true score theory and reliability Any phenomenon we decide to “measure” in psychology, whether it is a physical or mental characteristic, will inevitably contain some error. For example, you can step on the same scale three consecutive times to weigh yourself and get three slightly different readings. To deal with this, you might take the average of the three weight measures as the best guess of your current weight. In most field settings, however, we do not have the luxury of administering our measurement instrument multiple times. We get one shot at it and we had better obtain the most accurate estimate possible with that one administration. Therefore, if we have at least some measurement error estimating a physical characteristic such as weight, a construct that everyone pretty much agrees on, imagine how much error is associated with a controversial psychological phenomenon we might want to measure such as ...

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