PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Encyclopedia of New Media

iconEncyclopedia

Encyclopedia of New Media

Steve Jones

Pub. date: 2003 | Online Pub. Date: September 15, 2007 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412950657 | Print ISBN: 9780761923824 | Online ISBN: 9781412950657 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

About this encyclopedia
PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Text size

Electronic Democracy

Leslie Regan Shade

Electronic democracy refers to the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to extend, strengthen, and promote effective and efficient democratic practices between and among governments and citizens. The inherent nature of ICTs lends itself to electronic democracy. ICTs are interactive, global in scope, and increasingly ubiquitous. As more stakeholders (including diverse civil liberties groups) want a say in governance, and as access to ICTs becomes more pervasive, electronic democracy has taken on a new vitality and viability. Electronic democracy is practiced by governments, and through new forms of citizen engagement whereby diverse stakeholders use the Internet for mobilization, consultation, and public education and awareness campaigns. The benefits of electronic democracy are many. It can allow for communitarian democracy, where citizens can participate regardless of socioeconomic status or geographic location. It supports simultaneous, interactive communications among many people, with low set-up costs. Email allows for the forwarding and redistribution of ...

Users without subscription are not able to see the full content on this title. Please, subscribe or login to access all content on this website.