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Encyclopedia of Political Theory

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Encyclopedia of Political Theory

Mark Bevir

Pub. date: 2010 | Online Pub. Date: May 06, 2010 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412958660 | Print ISBN: 9781412958653 | Online ISBN: 9781412958660 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Climate Changi

Simon L. R. Caney

It is now widely accepted by scientists that the world's climate is changing. The most authoritative source of information is the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC regularly issues assessment reports, providing analyses of the science of climate change, the projected effects that this will have, and possible ways of responding to climate change. In its assessment reports (the most recent of which is the Fourth Assessment Report, published in 2007) the IPCC records that temperatures and sea levels have already risen and are projected to rise over the next century and beyond. It also projects increased exposure to severe weather events. It further reports that climate change is anthropogenic—that is, it is caused by human activities. The prospect of dangerous climate change raises a number of different ethical questions. These include: What normative criteria should one employ to evaluate the impacts of climate change? How should one ...

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