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Encyclopedia of Prisons & Correctional Facilities

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Encyclopedia of Prisons & Correctional Facilities

Mary Bosworth

Pub. date: 2005 | Online Pub. Date: September 15, 2007 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412952514 | Print ISBN: 9780761927310 | Online ISBN: 9781412952514 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Restorative Justice

Jacqueline B. Helfgott

Restorative justice provides an alternative framework to the adversarial-retributive justice model for dealing with offenders. In restorative justice models, victim needs are central, offenders are held accountable, and the government is a secondary player in the process of restoring victims, offenders, and communities to a state of wholeness. Emerging in its contemporary form in the 1970s, restorative justice gained widespread recognition in the 1980s, and by the 1990s became part of mainstream correctional policy and practice in the United States and countries around the world. Today, restorative justice has converged with the notion of community justice to become an alternative way of thinking about and responding to crime. Proponents of restorative justice argue that community members should play a crucial role in dealing with the aftermath of crime, enhancing public safety, and furthering the goals of social and criminal justice. Strategies that have become central restorative justice paradigms include victim–offender ...

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