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Rethinking Corrections: Rehabilitation, Reentry, and Reintegration

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Rethinking Corrections: Rehabilitation, Reentry, and Reintegration

Lior Gideon & Hung-En Sung

Pub. date: 2011 | Online Pub. Date: May 31, 2012 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781452230474 | Print ISBN: 9781412970198 | Online ISBN: 9781452230474 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Chapter 15: Rehabilitation, Reentry, and Reintegration in Criminal Justice Education

Lior Gideon

Rehabilitation, reentry, and reintegration in criminal justice education Some of the first images that come to mind when we think about corrections are prison walls, armed guards, and hardened criminals. Often, it seems as though correction has lost its meaning and that the exclusive focus of incarceration is incapacitation and punishment. Indeed, to a large extent students seeking education in the field of corrections are introduced to philosophies of punishment, causes of crime, alternatives to incarceration (e.g., community forms of supervision), and ideas on how correction systems can function better by reducing recidivism rates, improving public safety, and becoming more cost effective. These foci come as no surprise given the huge number of people currently under criminal justice supervision in the United States; 2.1 million people are incarcerated in federal or state prisons or local jails (Harrison & Beck, 2005), and an additional 4.8 million people are serving some us ...

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