PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America

iconEncyclopedia

Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America

John M. Herrick & Paul H. Stuart

Pub. date: 2005 | Online Pub. Date: September 15, 2007 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412952521 | Print ISBN: 9780761925842 | Online ISBN: 9781412952521 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

About this encyclopedia
PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Text size

Immigration and Social Welfare Policy (United States)

John M. Herrick

The history of the United States cannot be understood without acknowledging the millions of immigrants who have settled within its borders and who have shaped its culture. Popular belief holds that the United States is a refuge for the oppressed from across the globe, but history shows there have been confusing and complex immigration policies and practices in response to changing social needs and pressures. Theories have arisen to characterize the immigration experience. The “melting pot,” or assimilation, theory contends that immigrants blend into the United States and eventually become Americans, often by ignoring or forgetting their roots. Another theory, that of the mosaic, holds that America is a land of many peoples from different cultures and ethnicities who adapt to the United States but also retain their cultural and ethnic identities. These theories can be used to help understand immigration history and how the nation has responded to the ...

Users without subscription are not able to see the full content on this title. Please, subscribe or login to access all content on this website.