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Encyclopedia of Stem Cell Research

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Encyclopedia of Stem Cell Research

Clive N. Svendsen & Allison D. Ebert

Pub. date: 2008 | Online Pub. Date: September 15, 2008 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412963954 | Print ISBN: 9781412959087 | Online ISBN: 9781412963954 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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DNA Fingerprinting of Stem Cells

Mario Salguero

DNA FINGERPRINTING, or genotyping, is a common name that has been given to several DNA—based methodologies for determining the DNA signature or genetic identity of an individual that differentiates him or her from another individual of the same species. Use of DNA fingerprinting is important for research involving cultured stem cells (SCs) because of the need to guarantee the genetic identity of the SC line being studied and the fact that many studies of cultured human SCs have demonstrated a significant level of intras—pecies and interspecies cross—contamination. Historically, cross—contamination of cultured cells has been a major problem, with long—reaching repercussions, emphasizing the need to use DNA fingerprinting to prevent the use of accidentally cross—contaminated cultured human SCs. The need for precise methods for cell line identification first became apparent in the 1970s, when it was found that many cancer researchers who thought they were growing different types of cancer but ...

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