PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
The Encyclopedia of Political Science

iconEncyclopedia

The Encyclopedia of Political Science

George Thomas Kurian

Pub. date: 2011 | Online Pub. Date: October 22, 2013 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781608712434 | Print ISBN: 9781933116440 | Online ISBN: 9781608712434 | Publisher:CQ Press

About this encyclopedia
PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Text size

Semi-presidential System

Semi-presidential government systems were first defined in contemporary academia by the contributions of Maurice Duverger (1974, 1978, 1980), which were dedicated to the French Fifth Republic. Duverger identified a “dual authority structure, […] a diarchy between a president who is head of state, and a prime minister who heads the government,” as described by Giovanni Sartori in 1994. Indeed, as the most relevant variation on the theme of presidential regimes, semi-presidentialism may be defined by three basic features: a president who is popularly elected; the office of the president has de jure and de facto considerable constitutional authority; and there exists also a prime minister and cabinet, subject to the confidence of the assembly majority. Consequently, actual working patterns in semi-presidential systems are directly dependent upon the presence or absence of political congruence between the president and parliamentary majority. ...

Users without subscription are not able to see the full content on this title. Please, subscribe or login to access all content on this website.