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The Supreme Court, Race, and Civil Rights

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The Supreme Court, Race, and Civil Rights

Abraham L. Davis & Barbara Luck Graham

Pub. date: 1995 | Online Pub. Date: May 31, 2012 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781452234106 | Print ISBN: 9780803972193 | Online ISBN: 9781452234106 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Chapter 4: The Burger Court: The Era of Ambivalence and Uncertainty, 1969–1986

The burger court: The era of ambivalence and uncertainty, 1969ߝ1986 In many instances where the struggle for racial equality has made limited progress, that progress has been perceived as a threat and has been met with fear, hate and racism. After Chief Justice Earl Warren's retirement from the Supreme Court in 1969, President Richard Nixon nominated Warren Earl Burger to replace him on May 21, 1969, with almost no political opposition. On June 9, 1969, he was confirmed by the U.S. Senate by a 74–3 vote. Although Warren Burger was not well known outside the legal community, President Nixon was extremely impressed with his conservatism in criminal jurisprudence and with his behavioral propensity to narrowly construe the Constitution. In addition to Warren, President Nixon replaced Justices Fortas, Harlan, and Black with Justices Blackmun, Rehnquist, and Powell, respectively, within a four-year period. President Gerald Ford appointed Justice John Paul Stevens to ...

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