PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Theorizing Masculinities

iconBook

Theorizing Masculinities

Harry Brod & Michael Kaufman

Pub. date: 1994 | Online Pub. Date: May 31, 2012 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781452243627 | Print ISBN: 9780803949041 | Online ISBN: 9781452243627 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

About this book
PrintShare
Text size Increase font sizeDecrease font size
Text size

Chapter 11: Gender Displays and Men's Power: The “New Man” and the Mexican Immigrant Man

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo & Michael A. Messner

Gender displays and men's power: The “new man” and the mexican immigrant man In our discussions about masculinity with our students (most of whom are white and upper-middle class), talk invariably turns to critical descriptions of the “macho” behavior of “traditional men.” Consistently, these men are portrayed as “out there,” not in the classroom with us. Although it usually remains an unspoken subtext, at times a student will actually speak it: Those men who are still stuck in “traditional, sexist, and macho” styles of masculinity are black men, Latino men, immigrant men, and working-class men. They are not us; we are the New Men, the Modern, Educated, and Enlightened Men. The belief that poor, working-class, and ethnic minority men are stuck in an atavistic, sexist “traditional male role,” while white, educated middle-class men are forging a more sensitive egalitarian “New,” or “Modern male role,” is not uncommon. Social scientific theory ...

Users without subscription are not able to see the full content on this title. Please, subscribe or login to access all content on this website.