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Understanding and Shaping Curriculum: What We Teach and Why

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Understanding and Shaping Curriculum: What We Teach and Why

Thomas W. Hewitt

Pub. date: 2006 | Online Pub. Date: May 31, 2012 | DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781452204277 | Print ISBN: 9780761928683 | Online ISBN: 9781452204277 | Publisher:SAGE Publications, Inc.

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Chapter 7: Historical Foundations of Curriculum

Historical foundations of curriculum Roots of American Curriculum 156 18th-Century Curriculum in America 159 19th-Century Curriculum in the United States 163 20th-Century Curriculum: The Progressive Movement and after 169 Into the 21st Century: New Policy Initiatives and the Curriculum 180 Perspective into Practice: Examples From the History of Curriculum Change 185 Summary and Conclusions 186 Critical Perspective 187 Resources for Curriculum Study 187 References 188 Everything is connected…. None of us is untouched by the swirl and eddy of serendipity that drives human endeavors at all levels from quantum chromodynamics to painting your house. (Burke, 2003, pp. 1–2) In his many books, author James Burke continuously makes the point about connectedness, that all knowledge is related and no body of knowledge, no discipline, exists in isolation. While every discipline has a critical core of knowledge and tools, there is always other related knowledge to be studied in understanding the discipline. ...

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